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Women's soccer

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Women's soccer

Postby Iconoclast » August 4th, 2014, 6:11 pm

I doubt if anyone will read this or reply, but the Portland Thorns just set a women's professional soccer attendence record of over 19,000 last night. Now it is in soccer crazy Portland and attendence in other cities is paltry, but that seems pretty impressive to me. They are averaging nearly 13,000 a game. MLS seems to have taken root here in the US, although I'm still not sure it won't die at some point in the future. It will be nice if NWSL can take a foothold in some cities now.

Hey, I understand why most people don't watch soccer and I get it. I'm not always into it either unless I have a reason to watch it. But I hope a decent mass of people continue to develop an interest in watching the game.
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Re: Women's soccer

Postby Domer » August 5th, 2014, 6:44 am

I wish them good luck. It's going to be a tough hill to climb, though. Take the WNBA, for example. Basketball is more popular in the U.S. than soccer, but they have a hard time getting big home crowds.
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Re: Women's soccer

Postby bigearl » August 5th, 2014, 8:33 am

Domer wrote:I wish them good luck. It's going to be a tough hill to climb, though. Take the WNBA, for example. Basketball is more popular in the U.S. than soccer, but they have a hard time getting big home crowds.


Women's Basketball is a tough sell for the American public. People want to see the fast paced, high flying game that the men play, so its hard for them to sit through the much slower, below the style of the women. The basketball purist will enjoy it, but not the younger generation.

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Re: Women's soccer

Postby Domer » August 5th, 2014, 9:10 am

bigearl wrote:Women's Basketball is a tough sell for the American public. People want to see the fast paced, high flying game that the men play, so its hard for them to sit through the much slower, below the style of the women. The basketball purist will enjoy it, but not the younger generation.

I agree. I'm not a "purist" exactly, but I enjoy watching the women's game more than the Not Basketball Anymore the men play. You're right about the younger generation, but what the hell do they know?

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Re: Women's soccer

Postby Maz » August 5th, 2014, 9:30 am

Portland lacks an NFL team.
Portland lacks a MLB team.
Portland lacks a NHL team.

Besides the futbol clubs, Portland has the Trailblazers. Without any other competition, the professional futbol teams have success. That's the reason for it.

The NWSL has a chance to succeed where the other women's league's have failed, because:

A. The Mexican, American and Canadian national futbol federations are financially tied into the league, prompting them to funnel funds and all the best talent (that doesn't leave for Europe) into the NWSL, to improve the national teams success.

B. Instead of trying to make a big splash, they've used a conservative financial model to start the league with. A salary cap that's limiting team salaries to the $200,000 mark.

C. The most successful clubs in the NWSL (Portland & Houston) are tied in with their MLS counterparts, sharing facilities and other things; not being stand alone entities is what has kept the WNBA going for so long and played a big part in the previous women's league failures. It's expected that other MLS teams will also tie themselves to NWSL clubs.
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Re: Women's soccer

Postby Iconoclast » August 6th, 2014, 11:10 am

Maz wrote:Portland lacks an NFL team.
Portland lacks a MLB team.
Portland lacks a NHL team.

Besides the futbol clubs, Portland has the Trailblazers. Without any other competition, the professional futbol teams have success. That's the reason for it.

The NWSL has a chance to succeed where the other women's league's have failed, because:

A. The Mexican, American and Canadian national futbol federations are financially tied into the league, prompting them to funnel funds and all the best talent (that doesn't leave for Europe) into the NWSL, to improve the national teams success.

B. Instead of trying to make a big splash, they've used a conservative financial model to start the league with. A salary cap that's limiting team salaries to the $200,000 mark.

C. The most successful clubs in the NWSL (Portland & Houston) are tied in with their MLS counterparts, sharing facilities and other things; not being stand alone entities is what has kept the WNBA going for so long and played a big part in the previous women's league failures. It's expected that other MLS teams will also tie themselves to NWSL clubs.


Maz there is no doubt that Portland soccer teams benefit from the lack of competition. And this place is somewhat of an anomolie in that soccer is really popular here regardless of the lack of competition. This is a quirky town and I think people embrace soccer because it's different. However, Seattle draws really well. Seattle shares a bit of the counter-cuture effect that Portland has, but that's not the entire reason. And Seattle has NFL and MLB.

And you are correct in that from a cost perspective, it really helps to share facilities. Although the coaching staffs are not redundant and there are other costs that each team has to bare.

One other thing that the women's team has done here in town is to start an academy program, styled after the MLS academy program as well as taking elements from the European academies. It's the first academy program in the US and my daughter has been selected to be a part of it, in spite of not trying out due to her torn ACL.
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Re: Women's soccer

Postby Eric » October 31st, 2014, 8:39 am

Iconoclast wrote:MLS seems to have taken root here in the US, although I'm still not sure it won't die at some point in the future. It will be nice if NWSL can take a foothold in some cities now.

So long as we continue to see the inflow of immigrants, legal or otherwise, into the US from Latin America, Europe and Africa, and our kids and grandkids continue to play soccer at the grade and high school level, I have to think that the sport will only continue to gain in popularity over time. Hey, here is a global sport that even women here in the US will be excited about because so many of them have actually played it and understand it....certainly more than I do.
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Re: Women's soccer

Postby Iconoclast » October 31st, 2014, 3:20 pm

eric wrote:
Iconoclast wrote:MLS seems to have taken root here in the US, although I'm still not sure it won't die at some point in the future. It will be nice if NWSL can take a foothold in some cities now.

So long as we continue to see the inflow of immigrants, legal or otherwise, into the US from Latin America, Europe and Africa, and our kids and grandkids continue to play soccer at the grade and high school level, I have to think that the sport will only continue to gain in popularity over time. Hey, here is a global sport that even women here in the US will be excited about because so many of them have actually played it and understand it....certainly more than I do.



Yes, but that will help out MLS more than the women's league. Women's soccer far more popular in the US than in any other country. In Brazil, their team is awsome yet receives hardly any funding from the country, vs in the US, the women't national team receives a lot of support.

What is helping soccer in general, and the women's side is sharing in this, is that it is so popular with youths. If it isn't the most popular youth program, it is close. It's just that so many kids drop out by 4th grade or so, and the parents never get a full appreciation for the game by that time. I never appreciated it until my kids played it. I'm amazed at what they can do, especially my daughter who has earned the nickname Minny Messi from her teammates. You just need to get them past the bunch ball, picking daisy stage into the full field, knocking the ball around phase.
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Re: Women's soccer

Postby MikeTheTiger » October 31st, 2014, 9:40 pm

Iconoclast wrote:You just need to get them past the bunch ball, picking daisy stage into the full field, knocking the ball around phase.


When my son first started playing he was one of the fastest players in his league. He also was one of the few that understood what was going on and he was very aggressive. That combination allowed him to dominate. It took him a season to adjust to the 6-7 year division when he was promoted only a week after his 6th birthday. Even now at the upper end of the age range, the other players have caught up with him in quickness and awareness of the game. He's small for his age and doesn't have a very powerful kick. I keep expecting the other kids to overtake him. Yet, somehow, he keeps finding a way to make things happen. This season he scored 9 goals and had two assists (though not necessarily intentional) in 7 games. The two games in which he did not score or get an assist, he played only one quarter in the field. (They'll still at an age where players are rotated equally rather than based on ability.) We probably need to get him on a select team of some sort, but I'm not sure if he's mature enough to handle it nor am I sure we can dedicate the time needed as a family.

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Re: Women's soccer

Postby Iconoclast » November 3rd, 2014, 6:30 pm

MikeTheTiger wrote:
Iconoclast wrote:You just need to get them past the bunch ball, picking daisy stage into the full field, knocking the ball around phase.


When my son first started playing he was one of the fastest players in his league. He also was one of the few that understood what was going on and he was very aggressive. That combination allowed him to dominate. It took him a season to adjust to the 6-7 year division when he was promoted only a week after his 6th birthday. Even now at the upper end of the age range, the other players have caught up with him in quickness and awareness of the game. He's small for his age and doesn't have a very powerful kick. I keep expecting the other kids to overtake him. Yet, somehow, he keeps finding a way to make things happen. This season he scored 9 goals and had two assists (though not necessarily intentional) in 7 games. The two games in which he did not score or get an assist, he played only one quarter in the field. (They'll still at an age where players are rotated equally rather than based on ability.) We probably need to get him on a select team of some sort, but I'm not sure if he's mature enough to handle it nor am I sure we can dedicate the time needed as a family.


An alternative might be to put him on a rec team that has a good coach. Someone who played the game and puts them through good practices that involve the fundementals. The other thing that you can do is to just put obstacles out in the lawn and have him touch the ball around them. Sure you can do cones, but sticks work. If you can get him to do it on his own, becuase it's fun, then he will really improve his footskills.

I wouldn't worry about select teams until 8 or so. See if he sticks with it and develops a love for the game. If he has that at 8, you can do it. Our daughter didn't start rec until 7 or 8 and diidn't join a club team until she was 9. She then made a really top team at 10 going on 11 and never got to play. Coach wouldn't put her in. It's been a long journey since then. Of that initial team of 16, 2 quit soccer, one is going to play at Idaho, and the remaining 13 are all going to Pac 12, SEC or Big 12 teams. It was a pretty incredible team.
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